We like to think we have addressed virtually every question that one might have relative to bedding. We have also attempted to make most of these articles more informative rather than sales oriented.
As you may notice, some of our videos are older and shot pre 4K monitors. We are in the process of re-shooting them in higher resolution. However, the information these articles and videos contain are still relevant.
These articles include frequently asked questions such as: 

        How to remove wrinkles from your bedsheets without an iron.
   
            To view our article and video that demonstrates how to remove wrinkles in bedding without an iron, click here or read below.
       
       
            Water is a wrinkle release, which is why there is a steam setting on irons.
       
       
            To remove wrinkles from bed sheets or duvet covers, all that is needed is a spray bottle of water and a little bit of tension applied to the fabric.
       
     
            A fitted sheet, when placed over the mattress is already under some degree of tension. Simply spray, spritz, or mist the fitted sheets with your water bottle.
       
       
            With a flat sheet, place it on the bed, tuck the foot. Then grab a corner of the flat Printed Sheets at the top of the bed and gently pull on the fabric until it is a little taunt. Then mist the sheet with the spray bottle of water.
       
       
            With the pillowcases, stuff them with your pillows. Then suspend the pillowcase by the cuff with one hand and lightly spray both sides. Now hold the pillowcase at the cuff with both hands, lightly shake the pillowcase up and down. This will create tension on the pillowcase.
       
       
            With a duvet cover, go to one corner, grab the cover at the corner and lightly pull on the fabric to apply tension to it, then spritz the top side, repeat on the other three corners.
       
       
            Following these steps will make your entire bed look as if it has just been ironed. The best part is this process should take less than a minute to accomplish and can be done mid-week when your bed may begin to look a little frumpy. 
       
      How to make a luxurious bed like one you see in a hotel.
          To view our full article on the different elements used by hotels to give their beds and rooms a light cozy and inviting look, read our article/video found here.
       
       
            Decades ago, the Weston Hotel discovered that bedding was an important attribute to a guest's comfort while staying at their property. After all, why do most people stay in a hotel? To sleep of course.
       
       
            Hotels also discovered that many enjoy a simple, uncomplicated bed. So they began creating beds that were uncluttered and clean looking.
       
       
            Most hotels that have embraced this concept dress the bed as follows:
       
       
            White sheets, some may use bedsheets with a little decoration such as embroidery on the duvet cover, flat and solid sheets, pillowcases, and shams.
       
       
            Hotels also discovered that traditional bedspreads were heavy and difficult to clean and were not cleaned frequently. 
       
       
            As a result, they embraced the use of down comforters, as a down comforter is enjoyable.
   
   
        What is thread count?
     
            Thread count is a simple measurement. It is the number of weft threads plus the number of warp threads found in one square inch of fabric.
       
       
            To view our detailed article/video on thread count and additional information on different grades of cotton used in bed sheets click here or read our overview below.
       
       
            Many assume that thread count is an indicator of quality; it is not. This is why you may find 600 thread count sheets selling for $60 and some selling for as high as $1,000. 
       
       
            A primary factor that determines the quality of a sheet is the grade of cotton that is used. Substandard grades of cotton are inexpensive by comparison to high-quality grades such as Long-Staple cotton or Extra-Long-Staple cotton.
     
            Although Egyptian cotton is considered to be some of the finest cotton grown, there are also poor grades of Egyptian cotton. 
     
            Because a garment or bedsheet is labeled, Egyptian cotton doesn't mean it is. There is a lot of deception in the market place, likely 90% of the sheets and towels sold that are labeled Egyptian cotton are not.
       
 
        Are flat sheet necessary?
          To learn more about the benefits of using a flat sheet or not using one, view our article on this topic found here or read below.
       
       
            One advantage of using one is, a flat sheet provides an extra layer of protection for your duvet cover, coverlet, blanket, or other top of the bed items.
       
       
            Cleaning a flat sheet is far easier than the aforementioned items.
       
       
            Some find that they get tangled up in a flat sheet and will forgo using one. The downfall of not using one is you will need to clean your duvet cover or whatever you have on the top of your bed more frequently.
       
 
            The thing coming between you and a good night’s sleep might be the thin layer of bedding between you and your mattress.When it comes to improving your sleep, activity leading up to bedtime and the quality of a mattress are more frequently discussed factors, but as it turns out, bed sheets and pillow cases, such as dobby sheets could be the reason you’re not refreshed when you wake up each morning. 
                When it comes to improving your sleep, activity leading up to bedtime and the quality of a mattress are more frequently discussed factors, but as it turns out, bed sheets and pillow cases could be the reason you’re not refreshed when you wake up each morning. And, contrary to popular belief, a higher thread count, unto itself, might not be the solution.
           
     
                1. Higher thread count doesn't always mean higher quality.

           
                Think sheets and pillow cases with 1,000- or 1,500-thread count are more luxurious than those with smaller numbers? Think again. Michael J. Breus, an Arizona-based sleep expert known as "The Sleep Doctor," says thread counts exceeding 500 are redefining the word "thread" because, at that point, "what you're looking at is probably two textiles that are woven together."
         
                Ariel Kaye, the founder and CEO of Parachute, a California-based bedding company, doesn't even mention thread count on her website. "Anything that’s over 400 is a manipulation of fabric or thread," she says. "The problem with higher thread counts is that they use these synthetic finishes; when they dissipate, the sheets are going to be unrecognizable." Both experts recommend thread counts that top out at about 400.
         
                2. Some materials are cooler than others.
Synthetics have a tendency to trap heat, making for a more uncomfortable sleep experience; quality cotton gets better reviews. According to the Parachute website, Kaye’s company uses “Egyptian cotton, combed with precision to remove all impurities.” Breus' preferences are also along those lines. “The bottom line is that pima cotton or an Egyptian cotton are the best materials to use in a sheet," he said. "I, personally, like the sateen type of finish, just because it’s softer." For menopausal women who are prone to hot flashes and night-sweats, Breus often recommends moisture-wicking sheets, which offer next-level coolness.
            3. Wash new sheets before you use them.
                And, if possible, do that more than once. “Make sure that you wash your embroidery sheets set at least two times before putting them on your bed," Breus said, "because, a lot of times, when they’re in packaging, there are [irritants] that can get on them.”
     
           
                4. For sleepers with sensitive skin, detergent may be more of an issue than bedding material.
“The bigger deal with sensitive skin has to do with what you wash it in, in terms of detergent, than the actual textile itself, in most cases," Breus said. "So, what you really are looking for is those [detergents] free from things like perfumes, dyes and things like that." That said, Kaye's company is certified by OEKO-TEX, which checks to make sure no toxic chemicals were used in a manufacturing process. “Fiber might have been grown organically," Kaye said, "but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t processed without toxic chemicals."
         
                5. Toss bedding in the laundry basket every seven to 10 days.
There's nothing that feels quite like climbing into a clean set of sheets, so it might be worth doing a little extra laundry if you want to get the best rest. But switch out the bedding more often if you're more active than most. "Let’s say you work outside, and you’re not showering before bed, then, clearly, you’re going to have another issue; you’re going to have to change your sheets more regularly," Breus said. "But, generally speaking, I think a good guide would be once a week.”
            6. Seasonal bedding might make a difference.
“My wife and I, we change our sheets seasonally," Breus said. "We have more of a jersey, T-shirt-y material in the wintertime and a much lighter one, seasonally, for the summertime.”

           
                7. Buy new bedding every 18 to 24 months.
Like most clothing (other than, say, jeans and sneakers), newer bedding just looks and feels better. "Like any fabric, hot water and repeated washing will shorten the life span," Kaye added.
         
                8. Can't wait that long and want a less expensive solution? Just buy some new pillowcases.
“It will completely change the way your bedding feels," Kaye said. "It’s just a really easy way to get that freshness, and make you feel like you have a whole new set of bedding."

       
                9. Oh, and about that myth that silk pillowcases can reduce or prevent wrinkles?
Breus is skeptical, and contends wrinkles are more of a matter involving skin dehydration. “Whether or not you have wrinkles," he said, "has nothing to do with the surface on which you sleep."
           
           
               

           
       
   

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